Child have 2 tickets? can this be done?


#1

In 2008 we bought 10 day non-expiration tickets for the whole family and used five days. This year when we go, youngest dd still qualifies for child ticket but on our 1012 visit she will not.

Can I purchase her a 5 day ticket to use for this trip and then use her non-expiration ticket days in 2012?


#2

I don’t see why not.


#3

it depends the tickets might have expired over time


#4

When we bought the nonexpiring tickets years ago, we were told that they were good as long as they were purchased while the child was still within the eligible age backet. Last March we used the “Plus” part of those tickets at Blizzard Beach and my kids were 15 years old using the childs ticket that was purchased way back in 2004’ish…


#5

Sure. Your child will need to be with you when you change the ticket to an adult ticket and the date has to match the child’s age. In other words, I can’t buy a child pass for my now 11 year old today and try to change it to an adult pass in a few years because he would not have been a child at the time I bought the pass.


#6

[QUOTE=PrinceMickey;1022916]it depends the tickets might have expired over time[/QUOTE]A Disney ticket with the No Expiration option does not expire.


#7

[QUOTE=poohscabin;1022905]In 2008 we bought 10 day non-expiration tickets for the whole family and used five days. This year when we go, youngest dd still qualifies for child ticket but on our 1012 visit she will not.

Can I purchase her a 5 day ticket to use for this trip and then use her non-expiration ticket days in 2012?[/QUOTE]Totally kosher, no reason you can’t do it that way. Currently, the price difference between a 5-day adult ticket and a 5-day child ticket is $33. So I say, GOOD IDEA!

As Disney Teacher pointed out, Disney offers FREE conversion from a child ticket to an adult ticket, as long as it’s plausible that the “adult” this is being converted for was the “child” the ticket was originally bought for. ANd by the way, this free upgrade from child ticket to adult ticket is possible ONLY with partially-used tickets (like you’d have with a ticket with the No Expiration option).

In other words, you can’t buy a 10-day pass for your 8 year old, put it in a drawer unused, and then bring it to Disney World when that child is 14 and convert it to an adult ticket. You can’t do it that way. If it was used at least once before the child turned 10 (and you bought the No Expiration option), and THEN years later you return with that same “child,” then yes, in that case you can convert it for free to an adult ticket for that person.


#8

This sounds like such a money saving tip for those with kids that are considered a child this trip, but will be an adult (according to Disney) on the next trip. Interesting!!

What is the reasoning for even turning the child ticket into an adult ticket on the next trip?


#9

[QUOTE=CleveRocks;1025053]Totally kosher, no reason you can’t do it that way. Currently, the price difference between a 5-day adult ticket and a 5-day child ticket is $33. So I say, GOOD IDEA!

As Disney Teacher pointed out, Disney offers FREE conversion from a child ticket to an adult ticket, as long as it’s plausible that the “adult” this is being converted for was the “child” the ticket was originally bought for. ANd by the way, this free upgrade from child ticket to adult ticket is possible ONLY with partially-used tickets (like you’d have with a ticket with the No Expiration option).

In other words, you can’t buy a 10-day pass for your 8 year old, put it in a drawer unused, and then bring it to Disney World when that child is 14 and convert it to an adult ticket. You can’t do it that way. If it was used at least once before the child turned 10 (and you bought the No Expiration option), and THEN years later you return with that same “child,” then yes, in that case you can convert it for free to an adult ticket for that person.[/QUOTE]

Thank you so much for your reply, the way you have it worded makes total sense to me. I hadn’t thought about a no expiration ticket needing to be utilized in order to qualify for the free upgrade to adult ticket. So it will be to our advantage to purchase her a child ticket for this trip and save her non-expiration ticket for a later trip. Great Info.


#10

Wow. I totally forgot that we have one day and some plusses left on a child pass for DS. He’s 15 now and over 6 feet tall, but what the heck?


#11

We do too. I think Nate has a pass with two days left on it from 2004 and my DH and I each have a few days left from 1993. I’m sure we’ll use them some day but right now it’s just too cheap to add a few days to a pass.


#12

I’m trying to figure this out. So you take your no expiration pass, and then add additional days to it, and it’s less expensive?


#13

No.

It’s all very confusing, because it has nothing to do with common sense or logic. It’s a matter of knowing DIsney’s exact rules and policies. I’ve been keeping current on this stuff for years, but I know that when you’re fairly new to it it’s confusing and makes little sense. I’ll try to help.

There is a time-limit for upgrading a ticket or adding days to a ticket. Even for tickets with the No Expiration option, you can’t add anything to a ticket after 14 days from that ticket’s first use. So, for example, if you have days left from a non-expiring ticket you bought last year, you CAN’T add days to it now. Those leftover days are still good, but you can’t add more.

What Disney Teacher was getting at is that due to Disney’s pricing structure, buying, for example, a new 6-day pass costs almost nothing more than buying a new 4-day pass.

For example, let’s say you have 2 days left on a non-expiring ticket. And let’s say you plan on visiting Disney parks 6 times during your next trip. A 6-day ticket will cost you $231. If you decide to buy a 4-day ticket and then use up those 2 non-expiring days, that new 4-day ticket will cost you $225. That’s correct, that’s not a typo … the price difference between a 4-day ticket and a 6-day ticket is only $6. Six bucks.

So think about it. In the above example, you have a choice. You can buy a 4-day ticket and use your non-expiring 2-day ticket to give you your 6 days, OR you can just buy a new 6-day ticket and keep the non-expiring tickets at home for some other time. If you decide to buy the 4-day ticket and use up the non-expiring ticket, please realize that you saved only $6. Hardly worth it, in my opinion.

Since non-expiring tickets literally NEVER expire, I’d hold onto them for some unknown future time, some time when I might find myself in Orlando and only have time for 2 days at Disney parks. In that case, that would save you a TON of money, since at current prices a new 2-day ticket costs $156.

I’d rather gamble that some OTHER time in the future I’ll use up those 2 non-expiring days, rather than use them now and save only six bucks.


#14

My strong opinion about buying the No Expiration option:

Buying the No Expiration option is a good idea ONLY if the leftover days will TOTALLY cover you for one or more future trips. If you have to buy additional days to cover your next trip (over and above what’s left on the non-expiring ticket), then you’ve wasted literally hundreds of dollars.

Quick example …

Let’s say you will be goign to Disney parks 6 days this trip, and you end up going another 6 days a couple years from now. A lot of people will think it’s a no brainer to buy a 10-day non-expiring ticket now, then they’ll ahve 4 days left for next time and only need to buy a 2-day ticket for that next trip. The problem with this is that it wastes money. Here’s why …

A 10-day no expiration ticket costs $452. And then for your next trip you’ll be buying a regular 2-day ticket for $156. So for a total of 12 park days, you spent $452 + $156 = $608.

Now, let’s look at buying a regular 6-day ticket for this trip, and then another separate 6-day ticket for the next trip. Each 6-day ticket costs $231. $231 + $231 = $462.

In the no expiration example above, your 12 park days cost you $608.
In the 2 separate tickets example above, your 12 park days cost you $462.

So in this scenario, buying the No Expiration option would cost you $146 MORE than buying separate tickets for each trip. Multiply that times a family of 4, and you’ve wasted $584 on the No Expiration option.

Man, Disney folks are geniuses at making money, huh?


#15

No. What I meant was this–say I’m planning a 9 day trip and need a ticket for every day. The price difference between a 7 day pass and a 9 day pass is very little so it’s not worth digging the old passes out when we can buy a 9 day pass for only a few dollars more than a 7 day pass. Sorry I wasn’t more clear.


#16

[QUOTE=poohscabin;1022905]In 2008 we bought 10 day non-expiration tickets for the whole family and used five days. This year when we go, youngest dd still qualifies for child ticket but on our 1012 visit she will not.

Can I purchase her a 5 day ticket to use for this trip and then use her non-expiration ticket days in 2012?[/QUOTE]

Yes, you can. It has been done MANY times.