Guest Assistance Card


#1

Does anyone have any experience using/getting a card? My husband broke his leg and dislocated his ankle 3.5 weeks ago. He’ll be out of his cast and in a walking boot about 11 days before we leave. He will have only just gotten into the groove of re-using his right leg (he thinks he’s superman, and he’ll be fine:ohmy:). Will he be eligible for the GAC? Is a doctor’s note necessary? He’ll have the boot on during park time with a cane, and we are even debating renting a wheelchair from an outside company just in case.

How will the GAC be of a benefit to him?


#2

I know he may think he is Superman. I would feel the same but I think I would plan on a wheel chair. I don’t see how he could take that much walking. If you have a chair and an obvious boot, I see no need for a GAC. My daughter had a messed up knee a couple years back and used a wheel chair and there was never an issue at rides. Used the handicapped entrances and everything was smooth.


#3

Thanks cubsblue, I’m going to show DH your post to prove that I’m not the only one who thinks he can’t be Superman! I’m really pushing for the wheelchair too … don’t want any more unnecessary injuries.


#4

I would definately get a Wheelchair, AND a GAC. No note necessary.

One bonus is you and your family will be able to enter the attractions through the Fast Pass line without the need of a Fast Pass, which comes in hand when certain attractions have ran out earlier in the day.


#5

I agree with the above posters. Definately INSIST Superman get a Wheelchair to use. He is going to take a serious chance of delaying his healing process if he walks to much on that leg and to soon. If he doesn’t feel like getting the GAC card, let him pass on that. I don’t think both are necessary. He just needs it for walking right? See how he is on the days leading up to the trip and if standing on it for long periods of time bother him too, they get the GAC. Maybe use that as your bargaining tool to make him use the wheelchair…compromise?

The GAC card will allow him a special entrance the attractions. He will be able to use the wheelchair leading up to getting on the ride itself and avoid standing while waiting his turn. Again, definately see how he does standing for long periods of time on the days leading up to the trip and let that gauge if you need the GAC or not. Also definately INSIST he use that wheelchair. No way a healing injury can withstand the intensity of walking around a WDW park in the heat. Tell him it will make YOU feel better.


#6

:blush:Making me feel better. That’s what it’s all about :blush: . He’s slowly budging on the wheelchair issue. I’m thinking he will be more to it when the cast comes off and actually realizes that his leg is super thin and super weak. Thanks for your understanding, everyone!


#7

Having the wheelchair doesn’t mean he has to be in it all the time. He can walk and push but it will be there when he needs it. Or if he is really feeling like Superman, he can push you around so you can take a load off!


#8

Push me around :laugh:.


#9

If your husband decides to use a wheelchair, he may not need the GAC. Cast Members at each attraction are trained to explain to guests using wheelchairs how to proceed through the queue, where and how to transfer, etc. - they don’t need to see a GAC, they will assist the guest as soon as they see the wheelchair.

If you and your husband do decide to ask for a GAC, be prepared to explain to Guest Relations the kind of assistance he will need. He doesn’t need a doctor’s note, but they will ask him about what he needs so that they can put the instructions for assistance on the GAC for Cast Members to follow.

And for what it’s worth, I think the wheelchair (at least) would be a great option, even if like others said he has it as a “just in case”. Disney is A LOT of walking, even Superman would be sore after a long day! :laugh:

EDIT:
Also, please note, the use of a wheelchair or a GAC will not necessarily get you into the Fastpass line! At some attractions, under some conditions, it will, but please do not count on a wheelchair or a GAC getting you into all the Fastpass lines. Most attraction standby lines can accommodate wheelchairs and (depending on the assistance needed) the instructions printed on a GAC may not instruct a Cast Member to send you to the Fastpass line.


#10

I understand your DH’s hesitation to use a wheelchair. So… you guys might be able to come up with a happy compromise.

These little golf spectator seats double as a walking stick, and fold out into a little seat. Amazon.com: ProActive Golfers Walking Chair: Sports & Outdoors If he can walk pretty good, he could walk with the stick for stability and then fold it out when it’s time to stand still for lines, parades, fireworks, etc so he can rest. There are many different models, most ranging from $20-50. Sure beats the price of a wheelchair rental!


#11

[QUOTE=LittleMissMagic;1084050]I understand your DH’s hesitation to use a wheelchair. So… you guys might be able to come up with a happy compromise.

These little golf spectator seats double as a walking stick, and fold out into a little seat. Amazon.com: ProActive Golfers Walking Chair: Sports & Outdoors If he can walk pretty good, he could walk with the stick for stability and then fold it out when it’s time to stand still for lines, parades, fireworks, etc so he can rest. There are many different models, most ranging from $20-50. Sure beats the price of a wheelchair rental![/QUOTE]

Ooooo … I’ve seen those. Good idea. I shall definitely take that into consideration. Thanks for the suggestions :cool:


#12

[QUOTE=PrincessJill;1084016]

EDIT:
Also, please note, the use of a wheelchair or a GAC will not necessarily get you into the Fastpass line! At some attractions, under some conditions, it will, but please do not count on a wheelchair or a GAC getting you into all the Fastpass lines. Most attraction standby lines can accommodate wheelchairs and (depending on the assistance needed) the instructions printed on a GAC may not instruct a Cast Member to send you to the Fastpass line.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for clarifying. I guess that’s something they do more for mental than physical. I didn’t realize they printed different instructions on different cards. I thought situations where ppl were unable to stand in lines for a length of time were all the same. My bad :blush:.
My friend has a son who’s autistic and they never get in a hurry to get to any ride because once they get to one if there’s a FP line they flash their card and are always sent through there.
Thinking about it, it would make sense that since not all disabilities are the same the accomodations wouldn’t be either. :wink:


#13

[QUOTE=Mickeybug;1084081]Thanks for clarifying. I guess that’s something they do more for mental than physical. I didn’t realize they printed different instructions on different cards. I thought situations where ppl were unable to stand in lines for a length of time were all the same. My bad :blush:.
My friend has a son who’s autistic and they never get in a hurry to get to any ride because once they get to one if there’s a FP line they flash their card and are always sent through there.
Thinking about it, it would make sense that since not all disabilities are the same the accomodations wouldn’t be either. :wink:[/QUOTE]

No worries! I just wanted to put it out there so anyone who might read this didn’t expect Fastpass line access with every GAC.

The GAC is stamped by Guest Relations when it is assigned - there are different stamps that can be given, and some GACs may have more than one stamp. The Cast Members at each attraction are trained on where to direct the guest based on the stamp(s) on their GAC. However, each attraction is different, so even though you were directed to the Fastpass line at one attraction, you may not be directed there on the next attraction you visit.

GACs can help guests by allowing them to wait the standby wait time in a shaded/separate area (for heat/sun intolerance, claustrophobia, etc.) or to allow them access to the front rows of a show (for vision/hearing problems), or to allow them to use a stroller as a wheelchair, or any number of other things. In some cases, a guest may actually wait longer than the designated wait time based on the assistance that they need and the attraction’s method of accommodating it.

(Semi off-topic for the thread, but in response to your comment Mickeybug…)
I do think a GAC is great for guests with autism, because Cast Members are often not aware of what autism even is. I did a presentation to my fellow education Cast Members on research I did in college about guests with autism at Disney - they were shocked at how many kids they had interacted with that they now realized probably had autism. Without a GAC, if a guest’s child had autism and they tried to ask a Cast Member for a separate place to wait or a shorter wait time, the Cast Member might respond differently because they didn’t see any kind of disability. With the GAC, the guest doesn’t have to try to explain their situation to every Cast Member - they explain it once to Guest Relations, and then the Cast Members respond to the instructions Guest Relations put on the card with no questions asked. A GAC can make a big difference! :happy:


#14

This is some really great information Jill. Hopefully if anyone in need that strolls by this thread realizes they do have options where they previously thought they had none. Thanks again.:happy:


#15

This is all very helpful information. Glad to have a backbone of knowledge on the GAC before our arrival at the end of next month.


#16

I didn’t realize there were different GAC’s either. Without it, we could not go to disney. Thank you disney! We ALWAYS go through the FP line with my son with autism. Only time FP line was longer than stand-by line was when BTMRR had just re-opened after lightning storm. I have seen people in wheelchairs go through standby line. GAC doesn’t really work at “shows” that run on a continuous basis. Another problem is at queue’s like Test Track, you end up in a waiting area like a “show,” and then when the doors open, you get pushed out of the way. They need to change it to be like Mission Space.


#17

[QUOTE=PrincessJill;1084121]No worries! I just wanted to put it out there so anyone who might read this didn’t expect Fastpass line access with every GAC.

The GAC is stamped by Guest Relations when it is assigned - there are different stamps that can be given, and some GACs may have more than one stamp. The Cast Members at each attraction are trained on where to direct the guest based on the stamp(s) on their GAC. However, each attraction is different, so even though you were directed to the Fastpass line at one attraction, you may not be directed there on the next attraction you visit.

GACs can help guests by allowing them to wait the standby wait time in a shaded/separate area (for heat/sun intolerance, claustrophobia, etc.) or to allow them access to the front rows of a show (for vision/hearing problems), or to allow them to use a stroller as a wheelchair, or any number of other things. In some cases, a guest may actually wait longer than the designated wait time based on the assistance that they need and the attraction’s method of accommodating it.

(Semi off-topic for the thread, but in response to your comment Mickeybug…)
I do think a GAC is great for guests with autism, because Cast Members are often not aware of what autism even is. I did a presentation to my fellow education Cast Members on research I did in college about guests with autism at Disney - they were shocked at how many kids they had interacted with that they now realized probably had autism. Without a GAC, if a guest’s child had autism and they tried to ask a Cast Member for a separate place to wait or a shorter wait time, the Cast Member might respond differently because they didn’t see any kind of disability. With the GAC, the guest doesn’t have to try to explain their situation to every Cast Member - they explain it once to Guest Relations, and then the Cast Members respond to the instructions Guest Relations put on the card with no questions asked. A GAC can make a big difference! :happy:[/QUOTE]

That is great info! I’m grateful I don’t need it, but thanks so much for taking the time to post it all out!


#18

Tell superman you’ll make sure he his cape doesn’t get caught in the wheels … get in the chair!! Just because the hard cast is off, it still has healing to do.

I’ve broken my ankle twice (same one) and it took a long time to work up to walking any distance, never mind something like disney

Tell him the chair will be handy to carry all the extra junk we all bring into the park.


#19

Thank you all, and it was my pleasure to post it! I’m so glad it was helpful! I starting having poster’s regret after I put it up there… I was afraid it might have come off the wrong way. But I’m very happy it turned out to be useful info. :heart:


#20

[QUOTE=jo-jo;1084168]Tell superman you’ll make sure he his cape doesn’t get caught in the wheels … get in the chair!! Just because the hard cast is off, it still has healing to do.

I’ve broken my ankle twice (same one) and it took a long time to work up to walking any distance, never mind something like disney

Tell him the chair will be handy to carry all the extra junk we all bring into the park.[/QUOTE]

I was also looking at the positives of the chair … extra healing for his ankle while at the parks and a place to store the million extras we carry into the park. :laugh: Trying to look on the bright side of things.