Height Requirements


#1

Ok, I’m curious to know if anyone has had issues with the height requirements at Disney. I know my dd is like a hair below 44" barefoot. So I’m sure 44" in her sneakers. We did have a bit of trouble in 08 when she was only 40" exactly. The 40’’ rides she was an inch too short for occasionally. Splash Mountain, Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, etc. She was crushed that she was ‘too short’ by Disney standards. Has this been an issue for anyone? I’m all for safety and following the rules and so forth but she’s hoping to magically grow this much - in 18 days. :laugh:

I’ve noticed that at our local fair her height is ALWAYS an issue. It might say 40" but she’s too short for the ride according to their signs. I was just wondering if it was certain rides it seems off or if it’s all of them.

Thanks!


#2

Back in 2002, we went with a family who had a three year old son. The height sticks didn’t seem to be consistant. The first day, he measured 38" exactly for Kali River Rapids. They put a wrist band on him so that he wouldn’t have to be measured again, that day. Two days later, at Magic Kingdom, he measured exactly 36" for the Barnstormer. How he lost two inches in two days, idk. But they put a wrist band on him so that he wouldn’t have to be measured again, that day, either. So the measurements were consistant for the park but not necessarily for the world.

Now, some will probably disagree with this, but if you know that she is 44" and believe that it is safe for her to go on the ride, go ahead and dress your DD in her tallest shoes, and put a big bow on top of her head. You aren’t cheating, you’re just assuring it.


#3

I wonder if disney adds an inch to the stick for the shoes. So that 40 inch stick is really 41 inches or something like that.


#4

When my little sister was 5 (this would have been in the early 90s) my mom thought she would be fine because we knew how tall she was from her Dr visits. We were wrong because when we got there she was too short to ride any of the bigger rides and she was so disappointed. It was obvious to us at the time that Disney made the sticks taller than the actual height requirement. I don’t know if they do this to make up for the fact that kids may have tall shoes on or what. I’m going this summer with a 5 year old that is exactly the right height for a couple of rides so we will be investing in tall shoes just to guarantee she will be able to ride.


#5

HMMM, I wonder what would happen if you were turned away and then you happen to take out your craftsman tape measure that shows your child IS 40 inches???


#6

I’ve seriously thought the same thing! I doubt it would change anything but it would still be nice to prove them wrong if your child is disappointed.


#7

Dh thought that just after seeing our dd being denied once again for a ride. Especially since she’d been to the Pediatrician for a check up right before the trip and we knew her height.

I guess we’ll have to work on her posture, stick her in her sneakers, and hope she can ride the rides that are 44"/ sigh


#8

I’ve seen many children get their height measured on most of the coasters I’ve ridden and usually the ride operators will try to help kids get that last inch, unless it’s pretty obvious that the child doesn’t measure up.
I have seen thick soles and I’ve seen poofy hair.
Thick soles will often work while poofy hair seldom does.
Posture also matters greatly. When the child stands up straight, they often gain enough stature to be allowed to ride.


#9

[QUOTE=Soundgod;1033541]I’ve seen many children get their height measured on most of the coasters I’ve ridden and usually the ride operators will try to help kids get that last inch, unless it’s pretty obvious that the child doesn’t measure up.
I have seen thick soles and I’ve seen poofy hair.
Thick soles will often work while poofy hair seldom does.
Posture also matters greatly. When the child stands up straight, they often gain enough stature to be allowed to ride.[/QUOTE]

This is true. My daughter was allowed to ride Space Mountain last month by the CM at the entrance to the ride, who measured her carefully and said she was just tall enough. When we tried to go back later in the day, she again received clearance by the entrance CM (a different one than before), but another CM measured her just before we reached the loading area and said he couldn’t tell if it was because she wouldn’t stand up straight, but he didn’t think she was tall enough. I explained that she had been cleared by two previous CMs and allowed to ride earlier in the day, to which he replied “well then she just got lucky earlier,” and told us she couldn’t ride.

I’m ALL for following the rules and safety guidelines, but what irritated me was the inconsistency. She was clearly tall enough at the measuring stick outside the ride, but she did look shorter at the measuring stick at the loading area. Not sure how or why this is, but it was disappointing for my little girl. I’m hoping they’ll let her ride this weekend on the next trip.


#10

[QUOTE=Tinker Mel;1033704]This is true. My daughter was allowed to ride Space Mountain last month by the CM at the entrance to the ride, who measured her carefully and said she was just tall enough. When we tried to go back later in the day, she again received clearance by the entrance CM (a different one than before), but another CM measured her just before we reached the loading area and said he couldn’t tell if it was because she wouldn’t stand up straight, but he didn’t think she was tall enough. I explained that she had been cleared by two previous CMs and allowed to ride earlier in the day, to which he replied “well then she just got lucky earlier,” and told us she couldn’t ride.

I’m ALL for following the rules and safety guidelines, but what irritated me was the inconsistency. She was clearly tall enough at the measuring stick outside the ride, but she did look shorter at the measuring stick at the loading area. Not sure how or why this is, but it was disappointing for my little girl. I’m hoping they’ll let her ride this weekend on the next trip.[/QUOTE]

That is why we love the wristbands that they give them. Kings Island here in Cincinnati does the same thing. My kids will wear those things all summer, or until they grow that next 1/2 inch.


#11

Two months ago we had an issue on the same ride. At Indiana Jones at DL my daughter measured just over at the front of the line by a centimeter. The CM let us through. We waited for twenty minutes in line and finally as they were boarding us a CM decided to measure her. She was short by nearly a quarter of in inch. We argued with the CM for a moment explaining that she measured fine earlier but he wouldn’t budge.

Luckily, we had packed another pair of shoes for her that had higher heals in my backpack (this was specifically so she could ride Indiana Jones). Right there in the loading area we changed her shoes as the CM watched. We asked to measure her again and she was just tall enough. The CM let her ride.


#12

Back in 2002 or 2003 we took our older sons to Disneyland for the first time. They are only 15 months apart and at the time they were nearly the same height - 36 inches, which would allow them to get on most of the rides. Down at the end of Main Street they had an “official measuring stick”. A CM had an electric device which would measure a child and then the CM would put a color coded wrist band for their height - red for 36", blue for 40". Both kids measured for the 36" as expected. The CM then told us we would not be checked at any ride if we showed them our wrist band.

The word must not have been issued to the ride CM’s because none of them knew about it and insisted that we measure everytime. One of the boys was not allowed to ride at Star Tours because he fell below the marker. We complained with customer service, who responded that the official markers are at the rides.

My wife wrote a letter to Disney when we returned home. They did make us whole by sending three day passes for our family to be used within a year. We returned a year later and haven’t stopped going since.


#13

My wife, our last few visits, has packed a small tape measure just for this reason. We haven’t used it yet but almost did at Indiana Jones (see earlier post) but a seperate pare of shoes saved us.


#14

Do they not do the wristbands, anymore? I know they did them back in 2002.


#15

[SIZE=“3”]We are lucky that DD6 is very tall for her age so she can pretty much ride all the rides. I stick with the rule “if mommy feels comfortable riding it, you can” Just because she is tall enough, doesnt mean that she is ‘Big’ enough (in her upper body/shoulder area). No ‘open’ roller coasters for her…she would probably just slip right out!!:ohmy:
Her most daring coasters to date are RnR and Super Duper Looper at Hershey…which we rode 6 times in the front!!!:blow:[/SIZE]


#16

Disneyland does not do wrist bands anymore. If you are questionable they measure you everytime you go through, usually once at the entrance and again at the laoding area.


#17

I’m not worried about her being to ‘skinny in the top’ since she’s 44inches and 48lbs. She’s a little butterball, poor child has daddy’s body shape, SQUARE! :laugh::wub:

I’m trying to drill into her that she NEEDS to hold her head high and stand straight. Now only if she’ll do it. I just don’t see how all these height requirement sticks can be off?

Do they have wristbands at WDW? Because if so I think it’ll help. I hope. Her brother who is 8 is 50 inches and her sister who is 10 is 48 inches so I’m hoping she just melds into the group and gets on the main one’s she can go on. Thunder Mountain, Space Mountain (maybe), Splash Mountain, ToT, and She’d loooove to go on Everest. But we’ll see. She’s a thrill seeker like daddy. :laugh:


#18

[QUOTE=tinkfans;1033727][SIZE=“3”]We are lucky that DD6 is very tall for her age so she can pretty much ride all the rides. I stick with the rule “if mommy feels comfortable riding it, you can” Just because she is tall enough, doesnt mean that she is ‘Big’ enough (in her upper body/shoulder area). No ‘open’ roller coasters for her…she would probably just slip right out!!:ohmy:
Her most daring coasters to date are RnR and Super Duper Looper at Hershey…which we rode 6 times in the front!!!:blow:[/SIZE][/QUOTE]

I don’t really think that you have to worry about her slipping out of an over-the-shoulders restraint. Centripetal force keeps you in your seat when you’re upside-down. The over-the-shoulder restraints are to keep you in your seat when the rollercoaster turns, not when it goes upside-down (imagine yourself on BTMR - your body slides to the right in the seat as the rollercoaster turns left and lifts out of the seat on a quick drop, but on RnR, you don’t fall out of your seat as you go upside-down). Since the shoulder restraint also has a lap-restraint at the bottom, even if the rollercoaster were to stop while upside down, it would be unlikely that anyone would fall through the shoulder restraint.

Still, you are the parent and you should only take her on rollercoasters that you feel comfortable with her riding.