Holiday Lights


#1

Do we know how long the holiday lights are up after the Christmas rush?


#2

Most are gone by sunrise January 1.


#3

although I have never been there for this time, what Soundgod says is what I have heard too. That they are gone by New Years Day.


#4

Although I read that Osbourne Lights will be there until the 4th. I certainly hope so, as my brother and his wife will be there on the 3rd, looking forward to seeing them.


#5

Speaking of holiday lights - how long have they been using the LEDs rather than regular lights? DH was complaining how poorly they showed up in our pictures last month, but we were only in MK and don’t know if they were in use everywhere.
They were at our resort and I thought they looked very dim.


#6

Hey Cyn, I am thinking that I heard that this was the first year that Disney was using all LED lights. If I am not mistaken I think that is what they said on the HGTV show.


#7

Ah, haven’t caught the HGTV special yet (need to get the DVR going on that!). Thanks for the info. Still hoping it was just an experiment. I appreciate the “going green” and all that, but I just don’t like the LED lights for Disney.


#8

They started switching over to LED Christmas lights in 2007.
It’s taken a few seasons to completely change over.
And this is no experiment!


#9

Hmm… The LED lights I just bought say “10x brighter than regular lights.” Are most LED’s dimmer?


#10

Well… not exactly, but the 10X claim is a little misleading.

LEDs are more efficient and therefore are capable of emitting the same light with lower power consumption, or conversely, emitting more light with the same power consumption.

The reason that LED Christmas lights may not show up as well as incandescent lights has to do with differing wavelength characteristics of light coming from each bulb type combined with the default aperture / shutter-speed settings on a camera. I should probably shut-up because Doug’s a real photographer and can explain this much better than I can.

Long story short, Christmas light LED’s are the same brightness to the eye as regular lights and use considerably less electricity. For tips on photography, ask someone who knows (not me :laugh:)


#11

[QUOTE=MerlinMatt;1007810]Well… not exactly, but the 10X claim is a little misleading.

LEDs are more efficient and therefore are capable of emitting the same light with lower power consumption, or conversely, emitting more light with the same power consumption.

The reason that LED Christmas lights may not show up as well as incandescent lights has to do with differing wavelength characteristics of light coming from each bulb type combined with the default aperture / shutter-speed settings on a camera. I should probably shut-up because Doug’s a real photographer and can explain this much better than I can.

Long story short, Christmas light LED’s are the same brightness to the eye as regular lights and use considerably less electricity. For tips on photography, ask someone who knows (not me :laugh:)[/QUOTE]

Whew! Too much thinking for me during finals week! :laugh::laugh:
That did clarify what I was wondering though! Thanks!


#12

[QUOTE=MerlinMatt;1007810]
The reason that LED Christmas lights may not show up as well as incandescent lights has to do with differing wavelength characteristics of light coming from each bulb type combined with the default aperture / shutter-speed settings on a camera. I should probably shut-up because Doug’s a real photographer and can explain this much better than I can.
For tips on photography, ask someone who knows (not me :laugh:)[/QUOTE]

I’m not a real photographer either, my father was, so much of what I know I learned from him, however rules have changed a little in the digital age and it’s now 30 years since my dad walked the Earth.
Matt has a pretty good explanation, despite his feigned lack of knowledge.
One thing to keep in mind though, all of the LED strings I’ve seen in stores are only 50 lights while the non blink incandescents come in 50, 100, and 300. So, I’d start with the assumption that there are fewer lights on the LED trees than the incandescent trees.

Oh, in addition to aperture and shutter speed, also consider film speed (the ASA number). The higher the number, the faster the “film”. 100 is good for outdoor, sunlight, cloudless conditions (great color saturation, little grain) while you’ll want to use 400 indoors or night time. If you’ve got a better camera and it has settings for ASA 800 and ASA 1000, that is even better.
In the days of film, you could get an ASA 400 film and “push” it to ASA 800, but that’s a film thing, not an electronic image capture device thing.