I have a question on different meaning words


#1

I don’t know the answer, but what country refers to a stroller as a bucket? We were at a park and someone was telling her child to get into the bucket and we’ll get ice cream or something. Her child climbed into the stroller.


#2

I am curious too< I have never heard that before.


#3

I’d like to know the answer to that too…


#4

Sounds more like a REDNECK thing to me…


#5

:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh: “Git in that there bucket, Cletus”


#6

Matt always called Miss Caisley’s stroller her “Caisley Cart” but…I think it’s just because they both started with C…


#7

Wow, never heard that either. Maybe from the UK…? Just guessing though.

(My best friend growing up…her dad called bike helmets “pudding cups” :laugh: )


#8

Dads are just weird! :laugh:


#9

:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:


#10

[QUOTE=Screever;1051100]Wow, never heard that either. Maybe from the UK…? Just guessing though.

(My best friend growing up…her dad called bike helmets “pudding cups” :laugh: )[/QUOTE]

No not us:laugh: we call strollers -buggies- or pushchairs.


#11

When I was in England they always called them “prams”. I didn’t understand half the lingo there, the car had a boot and a bonnet and I lived in a flat instead of an apartment. I couldn’t pronounce “garage”, “aluminum” or “Adidas” correctly. Can you also explain to me what “snog” is? I had a very attractive young lady jokingly ask me for a “snog” and I just couldn’t figure it out (I did find out later and am sorry I didn’t take her up on it.) Now I ask my wife for a snog (kiss) and she slaps me, she doesn’t like that lingo very much. They keep telling me I speak English in America but after spending an extended period of time in London I am convinced that the languange is completely different here and should be called American.