OK - a TON of Questions? I am sorry


#1
  1. What is DVC like for teens as those years are fast approaching?
  2. Where in HI is DVC Resort, this could be a HUGE factor as wife and plan a trip there in 9 yrs for our 20th
  3. We are a middle income family - would love to know some of your annual household incomes to compare ours. The thought of DVC just seems too much even though the finance end seems ok. You can inbox me income…this would help A TON.
  4. Do you get to know any other DVC people - like will I find myself vacationing with people I have met before. I just think that would be cool.

The wife and I are seriously considering bypassing an expensive vacation for a year and saving and putting a good portion of cash down on DVC in 2 yrs. I can’t stand financing things and for me personally I can’t come to terms with financing vacations as all of ours are usually pre-paid and all other expenses are paid in cash (Dave Ramsey Fan). But I can see myself giving honeymoons to our kids as they get married and life after children being so much more enjoyable with DVC.


#2

We are not DVC members. Being frequent Disney-goers, we have looked into it several times, but it just doesn’t fit our vacation style. So this is not an anti-DVC post because I definitely see the positives of DVC, especially with the grown in the past few and upcoming years. But being a family with teenagers, this might help.

My sister and I are two years apart. Both being girls, sharing a bed is no problem. We are the standard family of four, which has made traveling very easy for us.

We stayed in the BLT Studio last year, so here is our comparison of DVC studio room vs. standard hotel room:

We had to sleep on a sofa bed, and it was smaller and less comfortable. Even if we upgraded to a one-bedroom DVC room, we would still be stuck on the sofa bed. We’re just two little girls, though (5’2" and 5’0")… I can imagine sofa beds being very uncomfortable for big teenage guys.

Being girls, we spend a lot of time in the morning getting ready. So things like a double vanity or a desk with a mirror really help cut time spent primping. The DVC studio at BLT had a single sink, and it was too high for us. It came up above my waist, so leaning over the counter was difficult. Now, this is just the BLT studio, so I doubt all of them have this problem. But the studio room definitely had less bathroom space than a standard deluxe resort room.

Beyond rooms, a big reason we didn’t buy into DVC ten years ago was because of the resorts available. Most were in the Epcot area, and at the time (still, even), Epcot was our least-frequented park. We prefer to stay in the MK resort area. However, now there is BLT and perhaps another popping up in the next few years.

Also, even though we travel to WDW often, we didn’t want to feel “locked in.” The trade-out options didn’t seem like you got enough bang for your buck. Points get you the most at DVC resorts. However, now there is the Grand Californian and Aulani… and definitely more in the future.

I think the idea of giving your kids honeymoons would definitely be more affordable with DVC. The point charts for Aulani don’t look that outrageous. However, airfare to Hawaii is typically outrageous. And then you have to keep in mind all of those other things you’d want to do… luaus, surfing lessons, helicopter volcano tours… I’ve never been to Hawaii, but my parents honeymooned and anniversary there. Plus I’m a Travel Channel addict. I enjoyed A Millionaire’s Hawaii. :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

But the resort is on O’ahu. The resorts there are really nice, and it’s not all touristy like Maui or Waikiki Beach. Maybe one day I will see for myself! :happy: :laugh:


#3

I’m not sure what I can tell you about DVC and teens but our only child is almost 13 and he still loves Disney and enjoys vacationing with his parents every year.

My DH and I are both teachers in a small town in a rural, lower income area so we don’t have huge incomes. We waited to buy DVC until the time was right for us. It took a few years but we knew waiting was the right thing to do.

If you are happy with value resorts and look at your room as a place to sleep and shower DVC may not make sense.

We haven’t met other DVCers who always travel when we do because we aren’t locked into a certain week at a certain resort. We change things up a little every year so I just don’t see that happening.


#4

One of the many reasons why we bought it was the idea of treating both our boys to a honeymoon. Love the idea that they can pick practically anywhere to go with so many choices available to dvc members.

As far as teens. Mine are 19 and 16. The 19 year old said he wasn’t going to go with us this summer, as he is in college and a very busy schedule. But, this past week, we as a family were looking at last year’s vacation pictures and out of the blue the 19 year old said he wanted to go, so have to do a little arranging with the dates. But, thats what I love about this timeshare, is that you are able to do that, switch dates. It’s so flexible and easy to use.

DVC has been an absolute gem for our family. Just last September, I found unbelieveable flight prices, and was able to go to Disney for two nights, on a whim. Would never be able to do that without DVC. It’s a good fit for us.


#5

If we ever did decide to get back into a timeshare type option again DVC would be it. I like the idea that you can pick a couple of days here or there instead of having to choose a whole week (or 2) and in some places that week is set unless another owner agrees to swap. I’m glad you asked these questions since if we did choose to do this one day the answers would help us as well.
We don’t really cook on vacate unless we have to so the kitchen option isn’t a deciding factor and we don’t relax much in the room, I can do that at home. So our reasons to DVC would really be geared toward price comparison, and as long as there are Military owned resorts around the world with Deluxe accomodations at less than some Value prices it’s hard for us to make that jump…but, the idea isn’t completely out of question. So share-on fellow MBer’s.


#6

We’ve owned DVC since 2000, our girls were 13 and 14 at the time…and we LIVED TO TELL ABOUT IT!!!

  1. What is DVC like for teenagers? Well, just like any other resort… As LMM said - yes - if you are in a studio or a one-bedroom the sleeping thing can get dicey. (one of ours usually ended up sleeping on the floor). However - we were in a refurbished one bedroom at OKW last time and the new chair in the living room now converts into a bed; which means that a one-bedroom can sleep 5, so that’s a consideration. As a family we don’t take a studio; and that’s DVC’s fault. We’ve become so spoiled about having a full kitchen, in-suite laundry, etc. that a one-bedroom, at least, is a must. If dh and I are on a trip by ourselves (and yes, I know you can’t, at this point, even imagine being a couple without appendages again, but it does happen), we take a studio. The pluses of having a one bedroom so far outweigh the minuses, that we never gave the sleeping thing much of a thought. If our spoiled little princesses wouldn’t sleep together - then tough - let them figure it out. I had my nice king-sized bed and a door that closed them out.:laugh: Problem solved.

Now that our girls are in their 20’s both have had the opportunity to use a studio with friends. That’s a pretty nice feeling, giving your kids such a gift.

As Beth said - it’s those little events that make it special. Last March dh was going to be golfing at Sawgrass, so I decided at the last minute to meet him at WDW, for a four-day stay. One call to DVC and we had a studio at Kidani Village. No hunting around for a deal or an available resort. It was great.

  1. The resort in Hawaii is on Oahu and we’ll be there in May. We’re intending on taking a drive out to see what’s going on. If they have a tour we’ll take it and report back.

  2. Well being ultra-rich, I can’t answer this question… I WISH!! We hemmed and hawed and went through the numbers for about 3 years before we bought. It was a huge decision for us. I’ll send you a pm.

  3. The only DVC people we know are friends here at home. I will say, though, at resorts (especially like OKW and SSR, which are more of a “community”) people do seem friendlier. I think maybe because we have that DVC thing in common.


#7

I had thought of buying into the DVC but found it was cheaper to buy a condo in Cocoa Beach. It is only an hour from WDW, not even 10 minutes from the cruise terminals and I can go there anytime without having to worry about the time of year or if it is available. The major plus too is that is right on the ocean. I know I don’t get the resort options at many different locations but for me all I need is the beach, sun and only a short drive from WDW and can hop on a cruise so easily.


#8

We’ve looked into DVC many many times, and while I would love to “Own a piece of the Magic”, the yearly fees are the hang-up for me. If it wasn’t for those fees, I think I’d be hooked.
I think it really depends on how you vacation. If you are able to go down multiple times for shorter visits throughout the year, I think it works great. For us, we can only get down once a year, and stay for a long time, and there are 5 in our immediate family, requiring 2 rooms at most resorts, so we need a lot of points for our vacation.
At this point, we just use the sales that Disney offers. Maybe one day we’ll jump in if the numbers work better for us.


#9

[QUOTE=llama;1070484]2) The resort in Hawaii is on Oahu and we’ll be there in May. We’re intending on taking a drive out to see what’s going on. If they have a tour we’ll take it and report back.
[/QUOTE]

My bad! :blush: :pinch:

I knew it was one of the less-touristy islands… oh, what should I know, I’ve never been there before??? :laugh:


#10

[QUOTE=dadofthree;1070462]1) What is DVC like for teens as those years are fast approaching?
2) Where in HI is DVC Resort, this could be a HUGE factor as wife and plan a trip there in 9 yrs for our 20th
3) We are a middle income family - would love to know some of your annual household incomes to compare ours. The thought of DVC just seems too much even though the finance end seems ok. You can inbox me income…this would help A TON.
4) Do you get to know any other DVC people - like will I find myself vacationing with people I have met before. I just think that would be cool.

The wife and I are seriously considering bypassing an expensive vacation for a year and saving and putting a good portion of cash down on DVC in 2 yrs. I can’t stand financing things and for me personally I can’t come to terms with financing vacations as all of ours are usually pre-paid and all other expenses are paid in cash (Dave Ramsey Fan). But I can see myself giving honeymoons to our kids as they get married and life after children being so much more enjoyable with DVC.[/QUOTE]

Are you set on DVC? The reason I ask is because I am also a Dave Ramsey fan and looking at the maintenance fees and overall cost of DVC turned me off of it. I love Disney and would absolutely LOVE to be part of the DVC community, but I found other timeshares to be cheaper. You can buy a very nice timeshare for much cheaper than DVC and then trade into DVC when you want. That’s how we do it. We love to travel all over, so this is a good option for us. If you are set on Disney every year, DVC is probably a good option for you. If you like to travel elsewhere, there are cheaper options out there for you to look into.


#11

First and foremost DVC is a timeshare. Second, Disney is in business to make money. Third, the three most important things to consider in real estate (including timeshares) are location, location, location. While it’s not the cheapest timeshare, you’ll never have trouble trading or renting it if you want to do a non Dis trip.

It is a real estate interest, but it is not to be considered anything other than an investment in you family vacations. You will no make money on it and you will spend money on your vacations at Disney. It will eventually be completely worthless but I and my family will have taken many, many vacations on it.

What Disney does better than anybody else to provide a wide range of activities for guests of all ages. If you enjoy Disney at 30 chances are you’ll enjoy it at 60 but while it will the same it will also be different.

If you are going to be doing Disney on sort of a regular basis, and you stay on site, DVC can make sense, IF you can afford it.

Almost forgot…HI is located on the SW side of Ohau only a 20-30 minute drive from the airport. Beautiful sunsets. This is the view from the Marriott Vacation timeshare 2 doors down.


#12

Thanks everyone…I am pretty informed on how DVC works and what it is and isn’t Now. We love to Vacation and have been to WDW 3 times in 5 years and would do more if we could manage it.
Because of what it is not is why I have a hard time coming to grips with financing DVC, which makes it a little harder to dive in. Every trip, including the weekend trips to in-laws are CASH only trips for us and has ALWAYS been that way since our honeymoon. The credit cards stay AT HOME. I don’t mind saving and paying for DVC, but if that day comes MOST if not ALL will be cash. I don’t want to worry about it after we become DVCers’ in case Murphy strikes and we can no longer AFFORD a monthly payment to Disney.


#13

I will never know if it was a good financial decision to purchase DVC, although I looked at it from a financial standpoint, we finally decided to do it for emotional reasons. We are in the same boat as you. We have four younger children ranging from 12 to 5. I got sick of having to book two rooms and praying that they made sure that they were connecting. We also felt somewhat cramped in the two rooms, especially when we had another couple with us, like grandparents. Now that we have owned for a couple of years it is very difficult to go to a normal hotel. There is nothing better then a two-bedroom villa and having all the space you would need for a family like ours. It is even better having your own bedroom, with a king bed and bathroom - it makes it feel more like home. The extra space makes our vacations that much more enjoyable.

We have concerns in the future whether the kids will continue to want to go to WDW or DL but I think there are enough other options now that we don’t worry about it as much. We are excited to try other places like Hawaii, Vero Beach and even a cruise (although I am not sure I would use my points for a cruise.) There might be a few years when we don’t get the most use out of our points but I should be able to rent them if needed and it will only be a short period. After that we will look forward to being able to treat grandkids to great vacations.

I would consider ourselves in the middle class as well, but that is a large class of people with a wide range of income. I think the secret to owning is making sure you can afford it, don’t assume that there will be any financial reward for purchasing. Purchase for emotional reasons, because you love to go to Disney, and this is great way to do it, much better than the value resorts. Would I give up a couple of years of vacation to afford it? We thought about that as well but decided not to because it was a time when our kids really enjoyed DL and didn’t want to miss a couple of years of prime time with the kids for years when they might not enjoy it as much. It took us three years to save enough to finally buy but we still went on regular vacations during that period. Now that we have it I find myself wishing we had more points, we are just starting to save for that as well.


#14

I don’t know if you’ve checked out DVCNews.com, but I find these two articles particularly helpful:

DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! - DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! | DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource!
DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! - DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! | DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource!

According to DVCNews, it takes 10 years to start saving money. And if you book a one-bedroom or more, you’re never really saving money. Breakeven for sure, but you aren’t getting any more than you could paying straight cash.

You might consider just renting points.


#15

After considering it for a couple of years, we bought into DVC in late 2003. It gives us the ability to travel more often and to more places than we ever would have done without it. We use it to take our family and extended family to Disney and Hilton Head. We’ve also been to Keystone Colorado on points, once in the summer and then most recently for our 1st ski vacation…it saved us so much $ in rooms and it was just awesome. Our kids are almost 17 years old and I want to be able to provide some of their college spring break trips and their honeymoons. We are middle income folk and the only thing I hope I can do is buy more points later on so I can provide rooms for my kids’ families someday!


#16

[QUOTE=LittleMissMagic;1070532]I don’t know if you’ve checked out DVCNews.com, but I find these two articles particularly helpful:

DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! - DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! | DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource!
DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! - DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource! | DVCNews.com - The essential Vacation Club resource!

According to DVCNews, it takes 10 years to start saving money. And if you book a one-bedroom or more, you’re never really saving money. Breakeven for sure, but you aren’t getting any more than you could paying straight cash.

You might consider just renting points.[/QUOTE]

It is hard to say IF you would save money. According to their chart, you start coming out ahead after the sixth yr staying in a studio. However, that’s at rack rate and then you have the argument what if you put the upfront money in an interest baring account. The DVC is sort of the dining plan of housing. You pay so much up front and then you “think” the room is free when you check out.

I’m sure if my DH and I stayed at a value in the fall with a discount deal, we would spend a lot less money than DVC. But would we enjoy it as much? Frankly we were getting a little tired of the hour wait at the end of the night for the 6th bus to come by. Only having a plastic chair or a bed to sit on. Now I know a lot of people would say “that’s no problem”, but then a lot of people climb mountains, run marathons, think nothing of driving 22 hrs to disney, but we aren’t one of those people. When it comes to parades, although I can still sit on a curb or stand in one spot for an hr, but DH would never make it. We have paid the college bills, the house is paid off, as the says goes “we are spending our kids inheritance”.

We bought DVC when I was 50 and DH was 60. If you do the math, we won’t be around till the end, but my kids and grand kids will. It gives me some satisfaction knowing some yrs down the road, we’ve helped them with their vacations. Right now the points are ours and we let them have some, but still around 75% are used by us.

We are THE cheapest people around (for ourselves, church and others are different). And although I would never put down staying at a value, I can not tell you how happy it make me to see fireworks bursting so close to our room at BLT, they filled the sky. To sit out on the balcony at AKV and watch the animals roam by every morning. To be able to be at epcot watching a show and be “home” at BCV in 15 min. For everyone it’s different, but for us, these are good things.

I am glad we bought into DVC. I do wish I had known a few details ahead of time.
One - get a use yr shortly before when you tend to vacation.

Two - instead of buying one larger contract, get a bunch of 50 point contracts. Easier to split among the kids and/or if you need to sell some, smaller contracts always seem to go fast.


#17

We are a middle income family and bought back in 1993 when the original resort was still being built. At that time, it was just called Disney Vacation Club but is now OKW. Our girls were 11 and 13 at the time. They never missed a trip and if at all possible, they still join us. In the 18 years we have owned, there have only been 3 or 4 trips that at least one of the girls has not been along. We go at least once a year and have been as many as three times in a year. We have never once regretted the purchase and I tell anyone that asks, if you are going to buy a timeshare at all, buy Disney. It is by far the easiest to deal with. No booking fees, no change fees…just always very easy. As others have said, it is not an investment for monetary gain but it is an investment in your family. Many times, we might not have taken a vacation, but this made it so easy. In addition, we have had the pleasure of sharing with so many of our friends. We have taken both sides of the family for a Christmas vacation.
As far as meeting other owners, the owners we have met have been through MB and being an owner had nothing to do with the meeting…only being there at the same time and arranging the meetings.
We have talked about skipping a year and I think we did it once. It was a VERY LONG year!!!


#18

We bought our DVC timeshare in 2007. We were lucky enough to be able to pay for the timeshare in cash. We didn’t think it was an investment we were going to make money on…We felt it was an investment in family time. We bought 200 points at Saratoga Springs. At the time we bought our DD was a freshman in college, and my DH’s son was married with a little girl. We thought if we already had a place to stay paid for, we would be able to afford to take the family on a vacation. Since our purchase we have gone to Disney as a family three times, and have taken a few vacations by ourselves and with friends.


#19

We now own at four DVC resorts and we do really feel like WDW is our second home. We take 3 or 4 trips a year, so for us, DVC works very well. Our weeklong stay at Beach Club during Christmas vacation would have cost about $3600 + tax. Without getting into a complicated formula, my actual cost for that trip was $1464 (annual dues added to the REAL cost of each point I purchased). It will take 8 similar trips for me to be on the positive side.

For us, it will be very much worth it, as our entire family and extended family will ue DVC well into the future. My kids have each picked two resorts that will be theirs when the time comes.


#20

Working for myself, I can appreciate that. I’ve paid “self financed” for all of my purchases with DVC by putting it on credit cards like the Disney rewards card (which give you 6 months zero interest with no cash advance fee BS) or similar so I’ve managed to keep all of my purchases under 12 month pay off.

DVC will finance 12 months at a low rate with 50% down which sound like a good option for you if you buy direct. Another option is buying in the resale market. You could, for example buy a small (25-50 point) contract for cash from someone. You are then a DVC member for much less than the 160 point buy in direct. Ok, 25 points won’t get you many nights stay, but you are now a DVC member and your purchase is free and clear. While there are now some restrictions on using points from resale contracts (mostly exchanges) BUT once you are a member, then you can purchase additional add on contracts as little as 25 points at a time cash or 50 points financed - both of which would allow you to increase your membership to the size you want without doing the 10 year loan thing.

I love Dave and he’s right about credit card debt but if cash is king how come he takes credit cards for the stuff he sells? :laugh: