Roaches and temperature violations at WDW restaurants?


#1

:ohmy: :ohmy: :ohmy: :blow:

Warning, this is the not-so-nice side of WDW (and Busch Gardens). So you MAY want to skip reading this article. Some of the infractions are relatively minor, but some are :blow:. I understand that this IS FL, but coming from the restaurant industry (family owned operations), problems like the ones mentioned in this report CAN be avoided if the kitchen is properly run. There really are no excuses…

Inspectors found roaches and temperature violations at some amusement park restaurants

And seriously, you may want to skip this one…

EDIT: And this could explain why some of us, including myself, have had randam food related issues after dining at WDW restaurants one time or another… Even if you have eaten the same dish at the same restaurant in the past…


#2

Well…it isn’t pleasant…(oddly enough it was the rusted cans of grape jelly that grossed me out the most and the beef and lettuce thing), but the temperature things…yes, I’m well aware of food poisoning, bacteria, etc. but I always wonder if my own kitchen was checked (and I am a stickler for CLEAN) would my food temps measure up? Probably not. I’ve been known to defrost meat on the counter all day…

The roaches - definitely not pleasant - but in a place the size of WDW, a couple of dead roaches in a light fixture…yuck, but I don’t think I’ll over-react. If it had been rats it would have been a different story. The world is not a sterile place and from what I hear about roaches - they’re persistent little critters who could live through a nuclear holocaust.

When DD worked at LeCellier she said the rules regarding the kitchen cleanliness were taken extremely seriously. They were written-up for the slightest infraction. And they held kitchen inspections before and after every meal service.

I’m glad that inspectors are diligent. Naturally everyone wants to feel they are eating food prepared in a clean environment, but stuff happens.


#3

After watching people in restaurants (not picking on anyone here) I wonder…do we still teach hygiene in schools? I remember going through a health class in Jr High that was 2 semester of basically hygiene. I remember in grade school being told about washing your hands after important life achievements and before interaction with food.

I watch people walk out of restrooms without washing up, rub their nose before assembling my food, wipe up booths seats and then use the same cloth on the table, and on and on and on.

I am to the point that I rarely eat out and when I do go out I feel like I need to don a bio hazard suit…ok I am not that bad but I knew we were in trouble when I started to see all the reminders in bathroom to staff to wash up after doing their business.

And PB you are right if you are running a business all this stuff should be second nature to you. If you kitchen is set up right you shouldn’t have these problems.


#4

These are minor issues when it comes to the restaurant industry. Probably happening at most, if not all, places you are eating at and the author is not telling the whole story bur reading from the health department reports and making the story up from there. The reports that are available online and to the public give generalities. The one that that points out “over 8 pound of jelly”. That was one can. It was in the “rusted or damaged” category. Most likely it was dented but since rusted came first that is what she went with. She really has know way of knowing what kind of damage unless she talks to the inspector. Also note that the very next day CP got a perfect score on the follow up. They corrected every issue even though you generally do not have a follow up for several days, they were ready. It is rare to get a 100% on an inspection but CP did!

Reading the CSV files and writing a story from them is not the way to go about a story like this. I see very little real work done on the part of the reporter. The usual media treatment trying to make things worse than they are by doing as little legwork as possible. I find this story amusing at best and in a way quite reckless.


#5

To come back to this point (and not excusing anyone) look at the amounts involved here and then think how little it is in comparison to how much food they serve at CP between 11:30 AM and 9:30 PM:
“On June 9, 2011 Crystal Palace had to throw out two large pans of shrimp and 10 pounds of NY strip beef because they were not properly cooled overnight. The restaurant also had to toss out over 8 pounds of grape jelly because the cans were rusted and not in good condition.”

Eight pounds of jelly? That’s the equivalent of 8 one pound jars. And that’s exclusively for PB&J sandwiches for kids. The grape jelly at breakfast is packed in those little sealed single serving packets.

Ten pounds of beef (160 ounces), at most 40 4 ounce servings.

Two pans of shrimp (doesn’t say what kind of shrimp, e.g. peel and eat).
Ever see how fast guests devour two pans of shrimp when it’s all you can eat?

Not to minimize the issues of food safety and cleanliness, but when you remember how much food they actually serve every day, these amounts aren’t more than a daily rounding error.

I agree, simply reading a report without the detailed information gives you a narrow view of a wide screen picture. This means you only see the middle but completely are blind to the edges.
That’s the difference between basic facts and in depth reporting.


#6

[QUOTE=Soundgod;1084376]To come back to this point (and not excusing anyone) look at the amounts involved here and then think how little it is in comparison to how much food they serve at CP between 11:30 AM and 9:30 PM:
“On June 9, 2011 Crystal Palace had to throw out two large pans of shrimp and 10 pounds of NY strip beef because they were not properly cooled overnight. The restaurant also had to toss out over 8 pounds of grape jelly because the cans were rusted and not in good condition.”

Eight pounds of jelly? That’s the equivalent of 8 one pound jars. And that’s exclusively for PB&J sandwiches for kids. The grape jelly at breakfast is packed in those little sealed single serving packets.

Ten pounds of beef (160 ounces), at most 40 4 ounce servings.

Two pans of shrimp (doesn’t say what kind of shrimp, e.g. peel and eat).
Ever see how fast guests devour two pans of shrimp when it’s all you can eat?

Not to minimize the issues of food safety and cleanliness, but when you remember how much food they actually serve every day, these amounts aren’t more than a daily rounding error.

I agree, simply reading a report without the detailed information gives you a narrow view of a wide screen picture. This means you only see the middle but completely are blind to the edges.
That’s the difference between basic facts and in depth reporting.[/QUOTE]

Well said.


#7

I’d like to highlight another passage concerning Liberty Tree:

“And according to that report, there were cross contamination issues in the walk-in cooler with raw chicken stored over raw pork and raw trout stored over cooked crab and ready to eat salmon. Inspectors documented 18 violations in that report with 8 critical violations and 10 non-critical violations found.”

And where are these inspectors when it comes to some Publix seafood departments where they actually allow shellfish and finned fish portions touch each other, as well as the “cute” practice of putting shrimp in the mouth of one or two of the whole fish in the display case.

Again, regardless of the venue, you are not supposed to let different types of raw meats touch and you are certainly not supposed to let prepared and cooked food touch raw food. You aren’t even allowed to have two different types of raw fish contact each other.
The exception being the final assembled products from your local sushi bar (raw fish and cooked rice).


#8

You know, the funny thing about the Liberty Tree part, is that for the life of me, I can’t remember them serving any seafood or fish, but I haven’t been there for lunch, or dinner, since they stopped the character dinners.


#9

I just want to clarify. I came to my conclusions about the cans after going online and reading the same reports that this reporter would have read. They do not distinguish between rusted or damaged cans. I sincerely doubt with the amount they would use that the cans sit there long enough to rust. Stating that they were rusted was a subjective conclusion on the reporters part.


#10

And did anyone read the response from BG about their restaurant?
Open since 2005 and this is the first and so far, only time they’ve ever been cited.
And why?

"Most of the issues concerned a refrigerator that had stopped cooling overnight due to a frozen condenser. The food inside had reached temperatures that are deemed safe for prepared food over a maximum of four hours. However, because we were unaware of when the refrigerator malfunctioned, we discarded the food immediately, which is our long-standing policy. Though the food was never considered for service to the public, it was recorded in the report as a “stop sale.”

Also noted were a few pieces of kitchen equipment that were not cleaned sufficiently as the restaurant closed the night before. However, a thorough cleaning of all food preparation equipment every morning is part of the start-up procedure for all of Busch Gardens’ restaurants. All of the issues noted by the inspector were addressed as part of that morning clean-up and were in compliance before the restaurant opened that morning.

As a result of fissure where a sink pipe comes through the wall, evidence of insect activity was discovered under the sink. The crack was repaired immediately, and the restaurant treated by Busch Gardens’ pest control team.

The inspector was back on site 24 hours later, and the restaurant was found to be in full compliance. Safety continues to be our top priority at Busch Gardens, and we stand by our record of quality service to our guests."

Sure, there’s a goodly amount of corporate CYA here, but the bottom line is refrigerators die when no one is around and bugs will get in through any and all access points, most of which are not within view of human eyes and it isn’t until long after the intrusion begins that the intrusion is discovered, especially with a creature that prefers the dark.


#11

I totally agree. Journalism has deteriorated to such an extent that every article has to be looked at as “entertainment” instead of delivering the facts in a non-sensational, accurate manner.


#12

I’ve never eaten there myself, but the current menu listed by All Ears shows salmon cakes and “this season’s fresh catch” at lunch.
Dinner remains the “traditional” (Stouffer’s) Thanksgiving dinner.


#13

Aside from all of the opinions, I just want to address this one statement:

[QUOTE=cubsblue;1084365]Also note that the very next day CP got a perfect score on the follow up. They corrected every issue even though you generally do not have a follow up for several days, they were ready. It is rare to get a 100% on an inspection but CP did!
[/QUOTE]

(and by no means am I discounting your opinion cubsblue, I just want to address this specific statement and this statement alone. Plus my comment is not directed at you, rather, it’s a “general” overall comment not directed at anyone in particular :happy:)

As we are all are aware, inspections are conducted unannounced so the inspector can review the operation as it’s truly run on a daily basis. And there is no doubt that an operation would be in full compliance after the fact, especially when they know that the inspector will be back for a follow up.

If inspectors advised each and every single operation regarding the relative vicinity of their arrival (week, day, hour) what operation wouldn’t be ready for said inspection? Naturally, extra attention WOULD be paid to the entire facility knowing full well that a health inspection is about to be conducted.

Aside from that, I know of a few businesses, be it wholesale or retail, that have to comply with “military” standards/requirements as well as “kosher” standards/requirements (far more comprehensive compared to the FL State minimum requirements) and the violations that were described in the article (regardless of one’s opinion of the reporters “intentions”) would have never occurred at said facilities. They would lose valuable business and not only are they subjected to unannounced “spot” inspections from the State of FL, but from the organizations mentioned above as well.

So while some of the infractions were relatively minor and some were borderline dangerous (cross contamination, dairy issues, bacteria build up, etc…) , one still needs to run a tight ship especially considering the reputation of the organization, the amount of money that they charge for food (on top of the admission price to get into a park before being allowed to purchase food at a specific restaurant on the premises) and ultimately, the safety of their patrons.

There is no question whatsoever that Disney takes “safety” VERY seriously, but no one is perfect and these issues are of concern…

Like it or not, your employees are a reflection of you (just ask Rupert Murdoch) and sometimes cost cutting measures (my personal opinion as one of the reasons the above most likely occurred) will bite you in the butt.

Will this prevent me from eating at WDW? Of course not. But as I mentioned before, it explains why I could have the same meal at the same restaurant on numerous separate occasions… And still get very ill for an evening and subsequent morning from the very same dish.

It happens.

And it has happened.

Hoop-Dee-Doo as well as Biergarten, I’m looking at you! :huh:

But I have been back to “both” many times and everything is honky dory.

And now that I think about it, I sense a trend!

Buffets & all you can eat???

Interesting.


#14

Chelsey and I were once queueing at the Pizza place in the old POR food court, when a cockroach walked right from under the counter, along the counter and disappeared. We were the only ones who saw it, and therefore decided we had suddenly gone off pizza.

I dont think it is excusable for any food violations to occur. Food poisoning in the extreme can be very dangerous, even fatal to the very young or elderly. I was once very ill after eating at Pinocchio’s at MK, and I know it was from there. But as PB said, I have since been back and it has been fine. The thing is with places like WDW the turnover of staff is terrific, and you are always going to get members of staff who do not adhere to food hygiene regulations like another person would.


#15

:blink::blink::blink:


#16

[QUOTE=papa bear;1084405]Aside from all of the opinions, I just want to address this one statement:

(and by no means am I discounting your opinion cubsblue, I just want to address this specific statement and this statement alone. Plus my comment is not directed at you, rather, it’s a “general” overall comment not directed at anyone in particular :happy:)

As we are all are aware, inspections are conducted unannounced so the inspector can review the operation as it’s truly run on a daily basis. And there is no doubt that an operation would be in full compliance after the fact, especially when they know that the inspector will be back for a follow up.

If inspectors advised each and every single operation regarding the relative vicinity of their arrival (week, day, hour) what operation wouldn’t be ready for said inspection? Naturally, extra attention WOULD be paid to the entire facility knowing full well that a health inspection is about to be conducted.

Aside from that, I know of a few businesses, be it wholesale or retail, that have to comply with “military” standards/requirements as well as “kosher” standards/requirements (far more comprehensive compared to the FL State minimum requirements) and the violations that were described in the article (regardless of one’s opinion of the reporters “intentions”) would have never occurred at said facilities. They would lose valuable business and not only are they subjected to unannounced “spot” inspections from the State of FL, but from the organizations mentioned above as well.

So while some of the infractions were relatively minor and some were borderline dangerous (cross contamination, dairy issues, bacteria build up, etc…) , one still needs to run a tight ship especially considering the reputation of the organization, the amount of money that they charge for food (on top of the admission price to get into a park before being allowed to purchase food at a specific restaurant on the premises) and ultimately, the safety of their patrons.

There is no question whatsoever that Disney takes “safety” VERY seriously, but no one is perfect and these issues are of concern…

Like it or not, your employees are a reflection of you (just ask Rupert Murdoch) and sometimes cost cutting measures (my personal opinion as one of the reasons the above most likely occurred) will bite you in the butt.

Will this prevent me from eating at WDW? Of course not. But as I mentioned before, it explains why I could have the same meal at the same restaurant on numerous separate occasions… And still get very ill for an evening and subsequent morning from the very same dish.

It happens.

And it has happened.

Hoop-Dee-Doo as well as Biergarten, I’m looking at you! :huh:

But I have been back to “both” many times and everything is honky dory.

And now that I think about it, I sense a trend!

Buffets & all you can eat???

Interesting.[/QUOTE]

I would like to get off subject just a little bit with a question. I know you’re in a different state so rules may differ, but can a restaurant refuse a health inspection?


#17

Very interesting article, but I agree with what the others have said. None of those infractions scare me. They don’t seem major to me and I’ve never had an issue with food at WDW. I do think the journalist “made up” the story from the facts that she could get her hands on and this is what causes so many people to panic in every day life.


#18

No, they can not.
The health inspectors have primacy in these matters.
Without checking, I’d say if any restaurant refused inspection, they’d be closed on the spot.


#19

While I’m not a lawyer nor is this my area of expertise, I know that in FL you can’t refuse. I suppose you can, but you won’t be in business much longer.

As far as other states are concerned, I can’t answer that question because every state in the union has their own set of laws. When it comes to state mandated ride inspections, I know for a fact that there are a handful of states such as MT which do NOT require a ride operator (big or small, permanent or portable) to be inspected at all. So perhaps the same goes for food based operations? I don’t know.

But on a side note, insurance providers usually (and in my experience, always) require an inspection of a food service facility (that they “insure”) so if the department of health (or whatever agency a specific state has created to regulate food based operations within their borders) is not required to inspect the various food operations within their state (permanent or portable), then the insurance company will “get em”.


#20

I inspect restaurants and other businesses as part of my work. These are not health inspections.

That said, most restaurants are very scary behind the scenes. Something the nicest places in the dining area are the worst in the kitchen. And all of these places get inspections - but things vary from day to day. I’d be far more concerned about fellow patrons making me sick that my meal.

Disney certainly isn’t happy about this, but you’d be hard pressed to find a place that has never had a violation at some time or another.

As for refusal of entry - right of entry for the health inspectors is likely required for maintaining their license to operate.