Taking your kids out of school?


#1

After reading the thread about the average length of everyone’s trip to WDW I am curious how many people take their kids out of school to travel and if you do how long do you go for? We have always gone during the school year and used to go 2 times a year. Now that she is in middle school we still go during the school year but unfortunatley only once a year:crying:


#2

We homeschool so we always take our kids out of school.ha ha:laugh:


#3

Our kids are still fairly young (2/4/6) only two are currently in school, but we always pull them out of school. Our average trip is 10-12 nights, but this year we did a 14night trip and pulled them out of school for 15 days. In our line of work the summer is extremely busy and not condusive to us taking vacation time. We also try to avoid crowds at all costs, so it works better to go during the school year.

Our teachers never have a problem unless the child is struggling with studies. I always ask upfront for homework and we start doing extra work a week or two before we leave.

We went to Disney almost every year as I was growing up and my parents always took me out of school, even through high school/college it was never an issue. It all depends on the parent/school/child.


#4

[QUOTE=Mickey Mom;953559]Our kids are still fairly young (2/4/6) only two are currently in school, but we always pull them out of school. Our average trip is 10-12 nights, but this year we did a 14night trip and pulled them out of school for 15 days. In our line of work the summer is extremely busy and not condusive to us taking vacation time. We also try to avoid crowds at all costs, so it works better to go during the school year.

Our teachers never have a problem unless the child is struggling with studies. I always ask upfront for homework and we start doing extra work a week or two before we leave.

We went to Disney almost every year as I was growing up and my parents always took me out of school, even through high school/college it was never an issue. It all depends on the parent/school/child.[/QUOTE]

Ditto. We stayed 14 days last fall and my daughter was starting a new middle school and we took her out for 10 days of school. We discussed it with the headmaster and basically told him the above and that we valued family time. Luckily our kids are good students, and we always request the homework ahead of time and turn it in promptly. Most teachers were more concerned that she understood the material, not how many homework assignments were completed. Looks like we’ll be down to 9 days this year, but the schools are used to it by now. Never even a hint of a complaint.


#5

Our kids are 10, 8, 4, and 18 months. We take them out of school 1 to 2 weeks a year. The older two are straight A students and we get their work from the school before we leave. The longest we ever pulled them out was this past February when we went to Hawaii for 10 days.

We are limited as to the months we can take off during the week due to our jobs. Unfortunately summer is almost always a no go.


#6

We took DS for his first trip at 8yo in May. Since then, we always go in May for an average of 9-12 days, taking him out for an average of 7-9 days. We would never go at any other time.

In Elementary school all he had to keep was a journal for 2nd and 3rd grade. 5th grade we requested homework to keep him up to date. He never had a problem getting back into the swing of things.

This will be the first trip with him in middle school. At conferences, we asked his team if it would be difficult for him with school work to take him in May or should we hold off and go in June, after school. They more than had a party telling us go for it in May and have fun. I was happy to hear that because I was not looking forward to going in June when it might be more crowded. We just have to be sure he brings all the homework home for the trip!

So in a nutshell, it is so worth taking them out of school to go to WDW!


#7

The schools in the UK are far stricter now than when our daughter used to miss school days for WDW trips.
At the time we went, we were allowed 10 unauthorised ‘school days’ (2 weeks) in addition to set school holidays.
The reason many UK parents used to take the additional days was because the travel companies really hike the cost of holidays up in school holiday time and then reduce the cost greatly once the kids were back at school.
We used to ask for work in advance from the school and make a Holiday diary charting everything we did and saw during the time spent in America.
Our daughter is now 19 and at one of the UK’s top universities, so it obviously didn’t do that much damage to her progress.


#8

Im guess I am the opposite!! I will not take my kids out of school for vacation, I am afraid that they will miss something too valuable!! But, on the other hand, my husband and I both have jobs where we can go during the summer- we usually go for 10 days, with this year being 14. We usually take 2 1/2-3 weeks for a vacation-travel time at a leisurely pace since we perfer to drive.


#9

Yes we pull our kids out of school for at least 8 days or more. We try to minimize their time out of school by planning around weekends. Our kids are 9 (3rd grade) and 11 (6th grade) now so we are rethinking pulling them out for future trips. In the past we have gotten homework from the teachers in adavance so the kids don’t fall behind. So far it has worked out great for us but we will have to make a decision about future trips.


#10

[QUOTE=dixie;953565]The schools in the UK are far stricter now than when our daughter used to miss school days for WDW trips.
At the time we went, we were allowed 10 unauthorised ‘school days’ (2 weeks) in addition to set school holidays.
The reason many UK parents used to take the additional days was because the travel companies really hike the cost of holidays up in school holiday time and then reduce the cost greatly once the kids were back at school.
We used to ask for work in advance from the school and make a Holiday diary charting everything we did and saw during the time spent in America.
Our daughter is now 19 and at one of the UK’s top universities, so it obviously didn’t do that much damage to her progress.[/QUOTE]

Good friends of ours live in Switzerland, and they have to get permission from the school to take their kids out beyond the set school holidays. This past Christmas our friends came home and were able to extend their holiday as the school had granted their request, however, at other times people have not been granted their vacation request. I’m not sure what the basis of the decision is overall. I find overall Europe is very family-friendly and very vacation-friendly.

Do you find that to be true?


#11

We always took our kids out when they were younger. However, when our daughter got to Middle School age it was quite a load to make up if she missed alot. Now she is in one of the areas toughest High Schools and has a lot of work all the time I cannot imagine, even being a straight A student, how difficult it would be to make up that much work!!:blink: I would love to go off season again. Maybe someday!!:huh::happy:


#12

Ok. This is a little crazy to say but I dont really care about my DD7 missing school. I figure she will make up whatever work IF any when she gets back. NOW for DD10 she is in middle school and I dont like for her to miss but it really doesnt matter to begin with because she hates to go so I just uslally leave her home and all works out.


#13

I’m with you tinker. My DD is 8 and I know she can make up whatever work she misses. I didn’t even consider going during her summer vacation as every other family in the world will be there LOL. She goes to school for 3 days and then we will be gone for 8 nights. Hurry up September!!!

Kim


#14

As a teacher I don’t mind my students missing school for a vacation as long as everyone understands that we will go on while the student is gone and he or she may be lost when the vacation is over.

I teach 8th grade science and do a lot of stuff that isn’t clearly explained in the book so if a student isn’t at school he or she may not be able to grasp that material. This spring I had two students go to WDW a week apart. One student didn’t miss anything she could read and get from the text book but the other student (an A student) was so lost in so many classes that she was nearly in tears when she got back and she wished she didn’t have to go with her parents. It caused her a lot of stress and just wasn’t worth it. The difference in the material just a week apart made all the difference.

I wasn’t upset either student was gone, in fact, I was happy for both of them. I think the older the child gets the harder it is to catch up when they return.


#15

[QUOTE=Mickey Mom;953570]Good friends of ours live in Switzerland, and they have to get permission from the school to take their kids out beyond the set school holidays. This past Christmas our friends came home and were able to extend their holiday as the school had granted their request, however, at other times people have not been granted their vacation request. I’m not sure what the basis of the decision is overall. I find overall Europe is very family-friendly and very vacation-friendly.

Do you find that to be true?[/QUOTE]

I am not sure what the proceedure is now, I know they tightened up quite alot as some children were being taken out of school for very long periods (6-8 weeks) and so sadly it impacted on everyone else.
However, we did used to have to get a ‘holiday form’ and fill in the dates we wished to take out of set school holidays.
I think you’re right, Europe is very vacation friendly in comparison to other countries, 4-6 weeks (including public holidays) is almost the norm here now and I am sure there are other industries who take more.
My friend is a high school teacher and she gets 3 months off a year. As for being ‘family friendly’ I think possibly countries like Italy and France probably are but I feel the UK is quite behind in that area- other Brits may disagree:eek:


#16

While I totally get why families might take kids out of school for a vacation and I don’t have a problem with it, it doesn’t work well for our family. #1, school isn’t easy for DS and for him to miss a week would be setting him up for frustration and failure. He has to work too hard in a couple of subjects just to maintain average grades. #2, I work for the district so if I take days off that aren’t scheduled days off, I give up a few days pay. That’s not good.
So, we only go when there are school breaks! :happy:


#17

I used to always take my DD out, but stopped when she got to 7th grade and the work was a little to hard to catch up on. I did take her out this year for her birthday, but did it at the last minute.


#18

We did take our kids out a couple of times. We went about every third yr and one trip was during summer. But reading on another board, some school are sooooo strict about it now. Missing class for a trip would knock down their grade a lot.

I do feel family time is important. If I had a child who did fairly well in school and didn’t miss a lot for other things, I wouldn’t hesitate taking them out once a yr.


#19

While I certainly believe in the value of family time, I think there comes a point in time when it is not advisable to take a kid out of school for an extended period of time regardless of how good a student that child might be. At the middle school level, work not only gets harder but progresses at a faster rate making it more difficult to make up. I think that while many teachers say they don’t have a problem with school-year vacations, they have to get frustrated with trips of 10, 12, or more days that cause students to fall so far behind; then parents get upset because the teacher isn’t doing more to help their kids catch up when, in fact, it is the parents’ fault for their own child’s lagging behind. Even for those kids who are “straight A students,” something is lost in not being in class. If those kids get sick, aren’t they in danger of exceeding the allowable limit of excused days?
I know it’s hard sometimes to plan, but most school systems are off in the summer and have generous holidays built into the school year.
I guess what I’m saying is that when kids attain the middle school (6th, 7th, 8th grade) years, they shouldn’t be taken out for lengthy vacations.


#20

We found it was too hard on the kids to try to make up missed work once they were in junior high. Elementary school is one thing to miss some school, but it gets harder as they get older.