Using Disability - Link inside


#1

Moms pay $1,000-a-day to hire disabled members to skip lines at Disney | Fox News

I knew it went on but from what I can tell, all you have to do is rent a scooter and put someone in it. Forget the $1,000/day pricetag


#2

"Disney allows each guest who needs a wheelchair or motorized scooter to bring up to six guests to a “more convenient entrance.”

This is so not true. The majority of the entrances now hold scooters, so you go in the regular line. For the ones that do have a separate entrance, not always faster. I know for the Safari, there is a separate line and truck for scooters/wheel chairs. You wait soooo much longer because you can only fit so many people on it, and then you wait for the truck to do the safari to get back to load the next group.


#3

[QUOTE=bethishooked;1133680]"Disney allows each guest who needs a wheelchair or motorized scooter to bring up to six guests to a “more convenient entrance.”

This is so not true. The majority of the entrances now hold scooters, so you go in the regular line. For the ones that do have a separate entrance, not always faster. I know for the Safari, there is a separate line and truck for scooters/wheel chairs. You wait soooo much longer because you can only fit so many people on it, and then you wait for the truck to do the safari to get back to load the next group.[/QUOTE]

…I observed this on Safari last time too…


#4

I just hate it when people try to abuse the system at WDW—hate hate hate it-----

I know of people–not friends–but people who went to school with my daughter who talked about renting a wheel chair to get to the front of the line faster. They even took turns with who was in the wheelchair!!!

I think on some attractions it could be an advantage—I have seen people in wheelchairs on certain rides go right up—but they are redoing loading areas so hopefully that will take away that incentive to “cheat”…


#5

Is any ride worth stooping so low? Where do these people get this sense of entitlement? These “Manhattanites” may be rich - but they are totally classless.


#6

What bugs me even more is the shotty reporting this news article is. I have very little respect for reporters now days. Just feel like they are reporting things just to get a rise out of people and somehow turning it around like it’s Disney fault. When was the last time anyone saw It’s a Small World at 2 1/2 hours? Did they do any fact findings before they decided to get everyone in a ruffle?


#7

shock effect- the facts are not important… plus, who says that it is not just a random statement that it happened…and someone overheard it, and reported on it… who knows what really happened…

if it did- it is despicable.


#8

Why not just hire the private guides? Never see them standing in lines.


#9

People suck - rich and poor. Thankfully this is not the norm. Honestly, anyone who abuses such things knows who they are and deserve every piece of crap karma throws back at them.


#10

[QUOTE=bethishooked;1133680]"Disney allows each guest who needs a wheelchair or motorized scooter to bring up to six guests to a “more convenient entrance.”

This is so not true. The majority of the entrances now hold scooters, so you go in the regular line. For the ones that do have a separate entrance, not always faster. I know for the Safari, there is a separate line and truck for scooters/wheel chairs. You wait soooo much longer because you can only fit so many people on it, and then you wait for the truck to do the safari to get back to load the next group.[/QUOTE]

Here’s something to look for. Next time you’re lucky enough to get on Midway Mania, look over to the far side of the load area and you’ll see the handicapped accessible load zone and the special wheelchair cars they have. Naturally, there are only so many of these cars, so there are times you will wait. Now, over on Rock and Roller Coaster, every train has one car with an actual door for handicapped access. But that’s only two seats each train. I think it’s the second car, so it would be the third row, which are not bad seats on a coaster.


#11

These people are pond scum.


#12

You know last time when we went to WDW I rented a scooter for my wife but that was because she has a couple of bad disc in her lower back and she can not walk the park but when it came time to ride on the rides she parked the scooter and we went thru the regular lines about 95 percent of the time it was only toward the last part of the week when she was totally exhausted that we used the bipass line for her but that was maybe a total 5 times. I think for those who need it they should do it but I have no mercey for a person that pays to try and bipass the line.


#13

True, if you’ve got that much money to burn, hire a VIP guide for your group.
What’s this cowflop about providing work for handicapped people and pretending this is a good thing?


#14

we used a scooter for my mom last year (overweight, slipped disc and rheumatoid arthritis). and the only ride we even remotely got on fast was the safari lol. i think we may have waited 2.5 hours for its a small world just because everyone who had a scooter or wheelchair went on it at the same time. we MAY have cut 10 mins off our TSM wait, but it really wasn’t noticeable.


#15

plus half the magic is the queues. Disney puts a lot of thought and detail into them. people are in just too much of a hurry to pay attention.


#16

I use the scooters twice now. Nothing special, you wait in line like everyone else and board the same place. Some rides you need to enter through the exit but not that special. We waited in line for carsland and enjoyed the wait with the 50’s music (even though the ride was down for an hour.) We got in and it was great!

If any one wants to take me to WDW or Disneyland I will do it for the free trip. But I doubt you will get that many “cuts” to make it worthwhile.

Why not make a disabled persons day by taking them to the parks. I wouldn’t mind just sitting on Main street watching people go by and listening to the music, especially during Christmas months. That was Walt’s real dream, sitting on the bench watching people enjoying the park…

Ahh! got to go back…


#17

Is it just me or has everyone else here had this article sent to them by every person they know this week? I guess as the requisite Disney lover amongst my friends and family, they all thought of me when they saw this story! Though I know there are certainly repugnant people who would try to abuse the system in this way, this particular article had so much bad information that I have stopped talking to people about it. :laugh:


#18

For that kind of money, they could do a VIP tour and skip to the front of the lines AND get special treatment. Not only are they classless and lacking morals… they’re ignorant.


#19

YES!!! i got like 20 pms and a number of texts lol! the funny thing is, i don’t care:) i had to travel with my mom in an ecv and it was more of a hassel than anything. we waited LONGER to ride it’s a small world since EVERY handicapped person in all of WDW rode it at the same time. it was embarrassing getting dirty looks from people when we boarded the busses. my mom is overweight so of course we looked like the “lazy” people but she actually has an auto immune disorder that makes it extremely painful for her to walk. also half the fun of disney is the details and entertainment they put in their queues. if it weren’t for that, universal and disney would be nothing more than a glorified six flags park. skipping the lines means your missing the magic and the story behind each attraction. and **** if i had that kind of money, instead of wasting it to rush through the parks, i’d use it to take a nice, long, relaxing vacation! PLUS you can get away with pulling a stunt like this for way cheaper. everyone is outraged but i thing the egg is on their face:) they are the ones missing out:)


#20

The only place I could think of that would be a huge advantage would be for transportation. Scooters and wheelchairs do go to the front of the lines there. Everywhere else it would just be a hassle getting through the load areas.